US-Russia Relations

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4 mins read

Spirit of the Elbe Day Honored in Washington and Moscow

April 29—U.S. and Soviet forces met during World War II, on April 25, 1945, at the Elbe River, which flows through central Germany. This meeting of the allied offensive coming from the West and the Soviet forces coming from the East was a clear indication that the war was coming to an end. Berlin was surrounded by the Soviet forces and would fall within a few days; the Germans would surrender on May 9. There was also a clear recognition by the U.S. and its Western allies that the war against Hitler was a success only because the Soviet Union, which had been invaded in 1941, had held out against the Nazi onslaught. This was done at the cost of more than 30 million casualties, far more than the combined total casualties of the other Western nations. Only China, suffering 20 million casualties in its lengthy war with Japan, had a loss in league with the Soviets.

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4 mins read

Time to Change Course

The idea is beginning to circulate of use the upcoming celebration of June 6, which marks the 80th anniversary of D-Day, the landing of Allied troops in Normandy, to begin a regulatory process in Ukraine that would bring stability to Europe and around the world

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5 mins read

Elbe Day 2024: The Dark, Deep Meaning

As I write, we are about to celebrate Elbe Day, the 39th anniversary of the meeting of US Army and Soviet troops on the banks of the river Elbe in the heart of Germany on April 25, 1945. I fear none of us may live to celebrate the 40th.

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April 25: “Meeting on the Elbe” Anniversary

Revival of ‘Spirit of the Elbe’ is the Roadmap to Peace

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7 mins read

Can Russian-US Scientific Cooperation Be Restored as Arctic Warming and the Ukraine War Intensify?

US and Russia have a long history of polar science cooperation.

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6 mins read

Biden Calls Putin a Butcher and Russia Thinks the US was Behind the Crocus Hall Attack

Lack of a Coherent NATO Policy

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Nuland’s Game is Up as Russia Smashed Ukraine’s Army – History Matters! | Ray McGovern

Ray came to Washington from his native Bronx in the early Sixties as an Army infantry/intelligence officer and then served as a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the administration of John F. Kennedy to that of George H. W. Bush. Ray’s duties included chairing National Intelligence Estimates and preparing the President’s Daily Brief, which he briefed one-on-one to President Ronald Reagan’s five most senior national security advisers from 1981 to 1985.

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8 mins read

More Anti-Russian Hysteria From the New York Times

A little while back, I challenged a group of graduate students to find one article in the New York Times written in the last five years that had anything favorable to say about Russia. Their extensive research turned up one article published in 2021 that described the beneficial effects of global warming on cold countries. The piece was entitled, “How Russia Cashes In On Climate Change.” Other than that, the newspaper’s sizeable cadre of Russia specialists reported virtually nothing about Europe’s most populous nation other than stories picturing Vladimir Putin and the Russian Federation as scheming plotters, corrupt and incompetent rulers, meddlers in other nations’ elections, brutal oppressors of their own people, and aggressive expansionists threatening everyone else’s independence and freedom.

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Russia’s Ryabkov warns US against entering new arms race

Nov 29 (Reuters) – If the United States expects to win the next arms race then Washington is mistaken, a senior Russian diplomat said in remarks published on Wednesday, adding that a military conflict between Moscow and NATO cannot be ruled out.

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4 mins read

The Historic High Points in the American-Russia Relationship

Even before the start of Russia-Ukraine war in February 2022 former Energy Secretary Ernest J. Moniz and Senator Sam Nunn have co-authored an article in the September/October issue of Foreign Affairs explaining that the risk of nuclear use has become disturbingly plausible—and proposing concrete steps to reduce the risk. “In the U.S.-Russia relationship, clashing national interests, insufficient dialogue, eroding arms control structures, advancing military technologies and new threats from cyber-space have destabilized the old equilibrium, creating a state of strategic instability where an accident or mishap could trigger a catastrophic chain of events,” – warned two distinguished politicians.