Latest News

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4 mins read

Spirit of the Elbe Day Honored in Washington and Moscow

April 29—U.S. and Soviet forces met during World War II, on April 25, 1945, at the Elbe River, which flows through central Germany. This meeting of the allied offensive coming from the West and the Soviet forces coming from the East was a clear indication that the war was coming to an end. Berlin was surrounded by the Soviet forces and would fall within a few days; the Germans would surrender on May 9. There was also a clear recognition by the U.S. and its Western allies that the war against Hitler was a success only because the Soviet Union, which had been invaded in 1941, had held out against the Nazi onslaught. This was done at the cost of more than 30 million casualties, far more than the combined total casualties of the other Western nations. Only China, suffering 20 million casualties in its lengthy war with Japan, had a loss in league with the Soviets.

news

5 mins read

Apocalypse Soon?

Can sanity prevail amidst this latest round of nuclear saber rattling?

news

5 mins read

Blinken rocks out on a road to nowhere

The Secretary of State delivered remarks to Ukraine this week that paint a rosy scenario defying reality

news

7 mins read

JOHN KIRIAKOU: The Heroism of David McBride

By 2014 McBride had compiled a dossier into profound command failings that saw examples of potential war crimes in Afghanistan overlooked and other soldiers wrongly accused. On Tuesday he was sentenced to nearly six years in jail.

news

6 mins read

When ancient history meets a modern conflict

On the passing of Pyotr Tolochko, a Ukrainian historian, academic, and politician

news

1 min read

The Proxy-War Is COLLAPSING! | Prof. Nicolai Petro

What is the meaning of the recent cabinet reshuffle in Moscow and what is the current state of the war in Ukraine? To answer these and others questions, Pascal Lottaz talks to ACURA’s Nicolai Petro. As the front lines of Ukraine are disintegrating and the political leadership in Kiev is in disarray, the west still refuses to seriously contemplate talking about a realistic peace (or at least cessation of hostilities) in Ukraine. Rather, the wizards in Washington, London, Paris, Berlin, and Warsaw contemplate NATO boots on the ground or—at least the germans—motivating Rumania and Poland to start using their air defence systems to shoot down Russian missiles and drones over Ukraine from the safety of their states. Crazy ideas and escalatory to say the least. This and the recent cabinet reshuffle are the topics of this first interview part with Nicolai N. Petro.

news

7 mins read

Georgia bill passes: Why the West needs to stay out of the protests

Mass demonstrations over a foreign influence legislation has its roots in the delicate balance between Russia and transatlantic community

news

5 mins read

Concocting lies in war.time

Wars and lies in Iraq and Israel

news

4 mins read

Time to Change Course

The idea is beginning to circulate of use the upcoming celebration of June 6, which marks the 80th anniversary of D-Day, the landing of Allied troops in Normandy, to begin a regulatory process in Ukraine that would bring stability to Europe and around the world

news

18 mins read

The SCO vs. NATO: The Clash of Two Security Paradigms

In a perverse replay of the build up to the first World War, the British are once again up to their dirty tricks and desperate to kick over the global chess board using the time-tested trick of “mutual security pacts”.

news

19 mins read

The blind spot of reason and conscience

«They shall not see with their eyes, nor hear with their ears, nor understand with their heart.» — Isaiah 6:10

news

8 mins read

Ukraine Army Largely Destroyed, Battlefield Losses, Mobilised with Mental Illness, Cancer, Forever War Crippling West, The $61bn Farce, Novorossiya Peace Basis

Ukraine has suffered troop losses of between 400 and 500,000 and Russian troops are advancing with increasing rapidity on all fronts. Arkhangelskoye and Kotlyarivka have been taken by Russian troops and the critical strategic town of Chasov Yar is about to fall. Even where Ukrainian troops had some success in breaking through at Rabotino in the Zaporizhzhia region they are now in retreat.

Editor's Pick

news

6 mins read

Yalta 2.0 Needed Now!

On Wednesday, February 14, Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), the Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said in a statement that his panel had “made available to all Members of Congress information concerning a serious national security threat.”

news

13 mins read

How Russia Challenged the NWO–Interview with Prof. Edward Lozansky

I have said in the past that the New World Order’s enduring legacy is contempt for morality and what Immanuel Kant calls practical reason in the comprehensible universe, which was created by what Aristotle calls the Unmoved Mover. We are still working with the same definition in this article here.

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4 mins read

Crisis of character. Increasing irresponsibility is at the root of our national decline

Crises, crises everywhere, as far as the eye can see. There’s a border crisis, a fentanyl crisis and a crime crisis. Massive deficit spending is leading to a fiscal crisis. President Biden’s 39% approval rating as he seeks a second term would suggest a leadership crisis.

news

6 mins read

America’s Central Europe Allie Do Not Make the US Stronger and More Secure

A mantra endlessly repeated by US officials and military leaders, especially in their testimony before Congress, is that America’s vast network of minor state allies in NATO and around the world provide it with resources and power that Russia and China cannot match. However, this is simply not true. It is a fantasy, unsupported by the factual historical record.

Foreign Policy

news

7 mins read

JOHN KIRIAKOU: The Heroism of David McBride

By 2014 McBride had compiled a dossier into profound command failings that saw examples of potential war crimes in Afghanistan overlooked and other soldiers wrongly accused. On Tuesday he was sentenced to nearly six years in jail.

news

7 mins read

Georgia bill passes: Why the West needs to stay out of the protests

Mass demonstrations over a foreign influence legislation has its roots in the delicate balance between Russia and transatlantic community

news

5 mins read

Concocting lies in war.time

Wars and lies in Iraq and Israel

news

18 mins read

The SCO vs. NATO: The Clash of Two Security Paradigms

In a perverse replay of the build up to the first World War, the British are once again up to their dirty tricks and desperate to kick over the global chess board using the time-tested trick of “mutual security pacts”.

news

19 mins read

The blind spot of reason and conscience

«They shall not see with their eyes, nor hear with their ears, nor understand with their heart.» — Isaiah 6:10

news

3 mins read

Seymour Hersh: Where are the National Intelligence Estimates?

Congress just passed an enormous aid package for wars in Ukraine and Gaza, but the White House is ignoring news it does not want to hear

Ukraine

news

3 mins read

Blinken in Kiev: ‘I’m Satan to Them”

Two thousand years ago, the reviled Roman Emperor Nero fiddled while Rome burned.

news

5 mins read

Apocalypse Soon?

Can sanity prevail amidst this latest round of nuclear saber rattling?

news

5 mins read

Blinken rocks out on a road to nowhere

The Secretary of State delivered remarks to Ukraine this week that paint a rosy scenario defying reality

news

6 mins read

When ancient history meets a modern conflict

On the passing of Pyotr Tolochko, a Ukrainian historian, academic, and politician

news

1 min read

The Proxy-War Is COLLAPSING! | Prof. Nicolai Petro

What is the meaning of the recent cabinet reshuffle in Moscow and what is the current state of the war in Ukraine? To answer these and others questions, Pascal Lottaz talks to ACURA’s Nicolai Petro. As the front lines of Ukraine are disintegrating and the political leadership in Kiev is in disarray, the west still refuses to seriously contemplate talking about a realistic peace (or at least cessation of hostilities) in Ukraine. Rather, the wizards in Washington, London, Paris, Berlin, and Warsaw contemplate NATO boots on the ground or—at least the germans—motivating Rumania and Poland to start using their air defence systems to shoot down Russian missiles and drones over Ukraine from the safety of their states. Crazy ideas and escalatory to say the least. This and the recent cabinet reshuffle are the topics of this first interview part with Nicolai N. Petro.

news

8 mins read

Ukraine Army Largely Destroyed, Battlefield Losses, Mobilised with Mental Illness, Cancer, Forever War Crippling West, The $61bn Farce, Novorossiya Peace Basis

Ukraine has suffered troop losses of between 400 and 500,000 and Russian troops are advancing with increasing rapidity on all fronts. Arkhangelskoye and Kotlyarivka have been taken by Russian troops and the critical strategic town of Chasov Yar is about to fall. Even where Ukrainian troops had some success in breaking through at Rabotino in the Zaporizhzhia region they are now in retreat.

US-Russia Relations

news

4 mins read

Spirit of the Elbe Day Honored in Washington and Moscow

April 29—U.S. and Soviet forces met during World War II, on April 25, 1945, at the Elbe River, which flows through central Germany. This meeting of the allied offensive coming from the West and the Soviet forces coming from the East was a clear indication that the war was coming to an end. Berlin was surrounded by the Soviet forces and would fall within a few days; the Germans would surrender on May 9. There was also a clear recognition by the U.S. and its Western allies that the war against Hitler was a success only because the Soviet Union, which had been invaded in 1941, had held out against the Nazi onslaught. This was done at the cost of more than 30 million casualties, far more than the combined total casualties of the other Western nations. Only China, suffering 20 million casualties in its lengthy war with Japan, had a loss in league with the Soviets.

news

4 mins read

Time to Change Course

The idea is beginning to circulate of use the upcoming celebration of June 6, which marks the 80th anniversary of D-Day, the landing of Allied troops in Normandy, to begin a regulatory process in Ukraine that would bring stability to Europe and around the world

news

5 mins read

Elbe Day 2024: The Dark, Deep Meaning

As I write, we are about to celebrate Elbe Day, the 39th anniversary of the meeting of US Army and Soviet troops on the banks of the river Elbe in the heart of Germany on April 25, 1945. I fear none of us may live to celebrate the 40th.

news

1 min read

April 25: “Meeting on the Elbe” Anniversary

Revival of ‘Spirit of the Elbe’ is the Roadmap to Peace

news

7 mins read

Can Russian-US Scientific Cooperation Be Restored as Arctic Warming and the Ukraine War Intensify?

US and Russia have a long history of polar science cooperation.

news

6 mins read

Biden Calls Putin a Butcher and Russia Thinks the US was Behind the Crocus Hall Attack

Lack of a Coherent NATO Policy

Аbout Vladimir Emelyanovich Maximov

Vladimir Emelyanovich Maximov (Russian: Владимир Емельянович Максимов, born Lev Alexeyevich Samsonov, Лев Алексеевич Самсонов; 27 November 1930, — 26 March 1995) was a Soviet and Russian writer, publicist, essayist and editor, one of the leading figures of the Soviet and post-Soviet dissident movement abroad.

Maximov Vladimir Emelyanovich

Biography

Born in Moscow into a working class family, Lev Samsonov spent an unhappy childhood in and out of orphanages and colonies after his father was prosecuted in 1937 during the anti-Trotskyism purge. He went to Siberia to travel there under an assumed name, Vladimir Maximov (to become later his pen name), spent time in jails and labour camps, then worked as a bricklayer and construction worker. In 1951 he settled in one of the Kuban stanitsas and started to write short stories and poems for local newspapers. His debut book Pokolenye na chasakh (Generation on the Look-out) came out in Cherkessk in 1956.

In 1956 Maximov returned to Moscow and published, among other pieces, the short novel My obzhivayem zemlyu (We Harness the Land, 1961) telling the story of Siberian hobos, courageous, but deeply troubled men, trying to find each their own way of settling down into the unfriendly Soviet reality. It was followed by Zhiv chelovek (Man is Alive). The former caught the attention of Konstantin Paustovsky who included it into his almanac Pages from Tarusa. The latter found its champion in Vsevolod Kochetov who in 1962 published it in Oktyabr, which he was then in charge of. It was met with both public and critical acclaim and was produced in 1965 by the Moscow Pushkin Drama Theatre. In 1963 Maximov became a member of the Union of Soviet Writers and in the mid-1960s joined the Oktyabr magazine's staff. All the while, though, his literary output was getting harsher, darker and more pessimistic.

Two of Maximov's early 1970s novels, Sem dnei tvorenya (Seven Days of Creation, 1971) and The Quarantin (1973) proved to be the turning point of his career. On the one hand, in retrospect they marked the high point of his creativity. On the other, steeped with the longing for Christian ideals and skeptical as to the viability of the Communist morality, both went against the grain of the norms and the criteria of Socialist realism. They were rejected by all Soviet publishers, came out in Samizdat, were officially banned and got their author into serious trouble. In June 1973 he was expelled from the Writers' Union, and spent several months in a psychiatric ward. In 1974 Maximov left the country to settle in Paris, and in October 1975 was stripped of the Soviet citizenship.

In 1974 Maximov launched the literary, political and religious magazine Kontinent to take up what many saw as the Hertzen-founded tradition of supporting the Russian literature in exile. It became the center point of Russian intellectual life in Western Europe, attracting such diverse authors as Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Galich, Viktor Nekrasov, Joseph Brodsky and Andrey Sakharov, the latter describing Maximov as "the man of unwavering honesty." Maximov remained the magazine's editor-in-chief up until 1992, when, during one of his visits to Moscow, he transferred it to Russia and granted all rights to his colleagues in Moscow. He was also the head of the executive committee of the international anti-communist organization Resistance International.

Among Maximov's best-known works written in France were the novels Kovcheg dlya nezvanykh (The Arc for the Uninvited, 1976), telling the story of the Soviet development of the Kuril Islands after the World War II, an autobiographical dilogy Proshchanye iz niotkuda (Farewell from Nowhere, 1974—1982), and Zaglyanut v bezdnu (To Look Into the Abyss, 1986), the latter having as its theme Alexander Kolchak's romantic life. All three, based upon historical documents, portrayed Bolshevism as a doctrine of ruthlessness, amorality and political voluntarism. He authored several plays on the life of Russians in emigration, among them Who's Afraid of Ray Bradbury? (Кто боится Рэя Брэдбери?, 1988), Berlin at the Night's End (Берлин на исходе ночи,1991) and There, Over the River... (Там, за рекой, 1991).

The drastic change in political situation in his homeland and the fall of the Soviet Union left Maximov unimpressed. He switched to criticizing the new Russia's regime and, while still a staunch anti-Communist, started to published his diatribes aimed at Egor Gaidar-led liberal reforms regularly in the Communist Pravda, to great disdain of some of his friends.